Difference Between ADD and ADHD

Difference Between ADD and ADHD

There’s much confusion regarding the difference between ADD and ADHD. Basically, ADD is an old term. For many years, ADD was used to define a type of ADHD. But of course, it hasn’t been a definite diagnosis for decades.

We have received many Emails in which we are requested to clear the difference between them as they aren’t sure if ADD (attention-deficit disorder) and ADHD (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder) are the same. If you’re one of those unaware people, then this article is for you. So, read this article carefully to know the difference between ADD and ADHD.

Before 1994, it was diagnosed with ADD but at present, the formal and prescribed diagnosis is ADHD, Mostly Inattentive Type. ADD is a type of ADHD that doesn’t consist of continuous movement and fidgeting.

Difference-Between-ADD-and-ADHD

Difference Between ADD and ADHD

Basically, the main difference between these two terms is symptoms. Their symptoms are different from each other. ADHD (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder) has three main symptoms:

Hyperactivity and Impulsivity

This type of hyperactivity occurs when a person has symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsivity but not inattention.

Inattentive ADHD

Inattentive ADHD is usually predestined when someone uses the term ADD. This simply means that a person shows sufficient symptoms of inattention but isn’t hyperactive or impulsive.

Combined ADHD

It is obvious with the name when a person has symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention.

These are three main symptoms, but some generally have trouble with response, attention, or focus. Though all these terms are the same and have common almost everything, the main symptom is inattention.

When ADHD kids struggle with attention, their challenges aren’t always sure and predictable. They may seem as introverted, nervous, shy, daydreamy, or off in their own world. They usually have trouble with a focus that effects kids in many ways.

Difference-Between-ADD-and-ADHD

ADD symptoms in children consist of three terms and add symptoms in adults are also in three terms but their efficiency can be varying.  Let’s comprehensively discuss all three terms. This will help you to understand the term ADD and ADHD.

Hyperactivity and impulsivity

As mentioned above, this type occurs when a person has symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsivity but not inattention. Hyperactive or impulsivity will be diagnosed by the doctor if the child:

  • Talk too much
  • Runs everywhere or ascents in incongruous situations
  • Unable to play silently or take part in activities
  • Seems very active
  • Always on the go
  • Can’t wait or has difficulty to wait for their turn
  • Gets up from the seat when assumed to remain seated
  • Wriggles in their seat, taps their hands or feet, or fidgets
  • Always interrupts others
  • Running or climbing in some unsuitable situations

Inattentive ADHD

Inattentive ADHD is usually predestined when someone uses the term ADD. This simply means that a person shows sufficient symptoms of inattention but isn’t hyperactive or impulsive. A doctor may diagnose a child as:

  • Can’t give attention to school work or other activities and makes offhand and careless mistakes
  • Is unable to finish schoolwork or tasks
  • Dislikes and evades tasks that need long periods of mental effort, such as homework and other activities
  • Pay no attention to a speaker, even when spoken to directly
  • Is forgetful and oblivious, even in daily activities
  • Has trouble to pay attention on tasks or activities
  • Doesn’t follow instructions
  • Loses important things needed for tasks and activities
  • Loses things often
  • Is easily distracted
  • Make careless mistakes

Hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity are the main symptoms. Moreover, a child or grown-up meet the following criteria to make a diagnosis with ADHD:

  • Has symptoms in more than one setting, such as at home, school, with friends, or for the duration of other activities
  • Shows some symptoms before the age of 12
  • Shows clear sign that the symptoms interfere with their functioning at home, school, work, or in social situations
  • Has symptoms that are not defined by another condition, such as mood, attitude or anxiety disorders
Difference Between ADD and ADHD

In 1994, doctors decided that all forms of ADD (attention-deficit disorder) would be called ADHD (attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder), even if the person wasn’t hyperactive. Now it’s called ADHD, ADHD, hyperactive/impulsive type, inattentive type, or combined type.

Kids with this condition ADD aren’t hyperactive. They don’t have the high energy level apparent in others with ADHD. In fact, children with this form may seem shy or in their own world.

Children with subtypes of ADHD may go undiagnosed because the symptoms may be put down to daydreaming. Child’s diagnosis will depend on their specific symptoms.

Difference-Between-ADD-and-ADHD

Reference:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attention_deficit_hyperactivity_disorder